Uncle Sam and Brother Jonathan Illustrations

Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper and Harper's Weekly, 1875 - 1879

 

Doug Boilesen, 2023

There are references to Brother Jonathan in Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper in 1875 but currently only one illustrated example is shown here of Brother Jonathan between 1875 - 1878. There are surely others but that illustration from June 26, 1875 exemplifies how far Brother Jonathan had artistically morphed into Uncle Sam. The difficulty to distinguish "who was who" without an identification in the illustration was reaching a point where it was only a question of time before Brother Jonathan would disappear.

The June 26,1875 illustration in Frank Leslie's is also interesting because Brother Jonathan is talking with John Bull. The two had been closely associated for decades going back to their 1813 illustration when they were physically fighting.

The numerous illustrations from 1878 showing Uncle Sam with John Bull are significant indicators as to how far Brother Jonathan's role had changed. Uncle Sam and John Bull together, not Brother Jonathan and John Bull -- an unambigous message to the world that Uncle Sam was now the symbol of the United States of America.

 

Brother Jonathan, Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, June 26, 1875

Brother Jonathan, Supplement to Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, June 26, 1875 - Brother Jonathan and John Bull

 

 

Uncle Sam, Frank Leslie's Illustrations from 1875

Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, January 9, 1875

 

Uncle Sam, Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, January 23, 1875

 

 

Uncle Sam, Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, January 23, 1875

 

 

Uncle Sam, Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, July 10, 1875

 

Uncle Sam, Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, July 18, 1875

 

 

Uncle Sam, Harper's Weekly, May 5, 1877

Uncle Sam by Thomas Nast in Harper's Weekly, May 5, 1877 - (Courtesy The Comics Journal)

 

 

Uncle Sam and John Bull, Frank Leslie's Illustrations from 1878

 

Uncle Sam - "An Expensive Kettle of Fish," Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, March 30, 1878

 

Uncle Sam, Harper's Weekly, April 20, 1878

Uncle Sam is shown on the cover of Harper's Weekly at "An International Conference About Money" after the US has made silver legal coinage to pay US bonds (which is interpretted in this illustration that the US is no longer a first class power..."We have passed from the class composed of Great Britain, Germany, France and Holland into that composed of Spain, Italy, Greece, Austria, Turkey and the South American States. We are, in short, now among the repudiators and defaulters." - The Nation

 

Uncle Sam at "An International Conference About Money," by Thomas Nast, Harper's Weekly, April 20, 1878.

 

Uncle Sam, Frank Leslie's Illustration May 4, 1878

Uncle Sam - "Spontaneous Resumption," Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, May 4, 1878

 

 

Uncle Sam and John Bull, Frank Leslie's Illustration May 11, 1878

The Mrs. Potts' Sad Iron ad in the May 11, 1878 Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper with the identified Uncle Sam holding the Sad Iron while revealing his plan to the Crowned Heads of Europe on how to "smooth out the map of Europe."

Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, May 11, 1878. John Bull on left.

 

Uncle Sam and John Bull, Frank Leslie's Illustration May 25, 1878

Uncle Sam - "I'll back both, if you're both sure pay!" Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, May 25, 1878

Uncle Sam and John Bull

 

Uncle Sam and John Bull, Harper's Weekly, May 25, 1878

"Revenge is an Expensive Luxury." Thomas Nast, Harper's Weekly, May 25, 1878

John Bull to Uncle Sam: "No doubt, you are now glad that "the indirect claims" were thrown out at Geneva."

 

Uncle Sam, Harper's Weekly, July 20, 1878

Uncle Sam - "Do you ever play Base-ball, or any American game?" Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, July 20, 1878

 

Uncle Sam and John Bull, Frank Leslie's Illustration July 27, 1878

Advertisement for A. Werner Champagne. Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, July 27, 1878 - Uncle Sam toasting in the back with John Bull seated in front.

 

Uncle Sam and John Bull, Frank Leslie's Illustration September 28, 1878

Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper , September 28, 1878 - Uncle Sam holding hands with John Bull.

 

Uncle Sam, Frank Leslie's Illustration October 12, 1878

"Our Platform." Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper , October 12, 1878

 

 

Uncle Sam and John Bull, Frank Leslie's Illustration December 7, 1878

A "Fishy" Bargain. Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper , December 7, 1878 - Uncle Sam and John Bull

 

Uncle Sam, Frank Leslie's Illustration December, 1879

 

 

Brother Jonathan, Harper's Weekly, January 1862

Brother Jonathan and John Bull - "Jonathan on the Mason and Slidell Affair," Harper's Weekly, January 1862

 

Brother Jonathan, Harper's Weekly, June 1859

Brother Jonathan - "Sympathy for Italian Organ-Grinders," Harper's Weekly, June 1859

 

 

3) ...Brother Jonathan becoming "a designation for the whole country, as John Bull has for England."

 

The following articles are other examples of how a story like the history of the term Brother Jonathan would circulate and appear in newspapers across the world as a factoid, in this case it is unknown what was prompting these pieces of information at this point in time.

 

Tulare County Times, January 5, 1878, p. 2 (Visalia, CA)

 

Similiar 1878 articles about the the history of the term Brother Jonathan would appear in newspapers across the world as a factoid emphasizing Jonathan's original role as a fixer and someone to consult in difficult times. It is unknown what was prompting this seemingly random piece of information at this point in time but it was the same time period when Uncle Sam was becoming the prominent representative of the federal govenment and the United States with Brother Jonathan morphing into Uncle Sam.

 

The Graphic: A Weekly Illustrated Newspaper, June 15, 1878, p.9 (London)

 

 

The New York Daily Herald, Feburary 27, 1878 (p. 10) published a lengthy article about success of The Children's Carnival and Ball sponsored by the Music Academy. It was noted that the programme opened with "Prince Carnival" offering his services to the Goddess of Liberty and Brother Jonathan."

 

 

 

 

 

4) In an article titled American Nicknames it was noted that "A native American can not receive a higher compliment than to be styled Brother Jonathan;" The article then explained the origin of Brother Jonathan's name.

The Wynadott Herald, September 26, 1878, p. 1 (Kansas)

 

 

5) To the European who has studied Brother Jonathan through the medium of Sam Slick or the broad caricatures of Yankee Hill, it is a somewhat startling revelation that the young man who was once Brother Jonathan, but has now become Uncle Sam...

 

Central Somerset Gazette (England), September 28, 1878, p. 5

 

6) Brother Jonathan's abilities in international commerce are complimented - "he will always keep his end level, in international commerce."

Wisconsin State Journal, June 26, 1878, p. 1

 

 

 

 

Brother Jonathan by Thomas Nast, 19th Century (Wikipedia Commons)

 

Uncle Sam Cast Iron Mechanical Bank (ca. 1886)

Uncle Sam Cast Iron Mechanical Bank (ca. 1886) - Designed by Charles Shepard and Peter Adams Jr. and manufactured by Shepard Hardware Company in Buffalo, New York. The brown carpet bag opens when lever is pressed as the coin placed in Uncle Samís extended hand drops into it. At the same time, Sam's bearded chin rocks back and forth, simulating laughter. Patented June 8, 1886. (Courtesy Z & K Antiques.)

 

 

 

 

Phonographia