Disclaimer

 

 

 

Phonographia.com and Friends of the Phonograph have used recordings from the University of California Santa Barbara Library Collection, the Library of Congress National Jukebox and other historic and cultural documents, recordings and images which reflect the attitudes, perspectives, and beliefs of different times. We do not endorse the views or images expressed by those respective documents and recordings which may contain content offensive to visitors of this site.

The following Library of Congress and UCSB Disclaimers are included here to emphasize the importance of this distinction between presenting historical materials versus endorsing and/or accepting those views.

 

Library of Congress Disclaimer

The National Jukebox is a project of the Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation. The goal of the Jukebox is to present to the widest audience possible early commercial sound recordings, offering a broad range of historical and cultural documents as a contribution to education and lifelong learning. These selections are presented as part of the record of the past. They are historical documents which reflect the attitudes, perspectives, and beliefs of different times. The Library of Congress does not endorse the views expressed in these recordings, which may contain content offensive to users.

 

UC Santa Barbara Library Disclaimer About "Dialect Recordings"

"Coon songs," "rube sketches," "Irish character songs," and other dialect recordings that were popular in vaudeville routines and genres of songs during the late 19th and early 20th century often contain negative stereotypes and portrayals of blacks and other ethnic groups. These recordings reflect the attitudes, perspectives, and beliefs of different times. Many individuals may find the content offensive. Some of these songs and recitations were written or performed by members of the ethnic group in question, while others were not, such as the tradition of blackface minstrelsy of whites performing caricatured portrayals of blacks. To exclude these cylinders from the digital collection would deprive scholars and the public the opportunity to learn about the past and would present a distorted picture of popular culture and music making during this time period. The mission of the UCSB Library is to make its resources available to the faculty, staff, and students of the university community and to the general public. The UCSB Library presents these documents as part of the record of the past and does not endorse the views expressed in these collections.