The Phonograph and Its Future

Probability: Educational Purposes

 

Educational Purposes.-- As an elocutionary teacher, or as a primary teacher for children, it will certainly be invaluable. By it difficult passages may be correctly rendered for the pupil but once, after which he has only to apply to his phonograph for in instructions. The child may thus learn to spell, commit to memory, a lesson set for it, etc., etc.

Note: Edison's "probability" discussed under "Phonographic Books" which identifies that for the "preservation of languages they would be invaluable" could also be applicable to this "Educational Purposes" probability.

 

As a "primary teacher" for learning a language this conversational course of the Meisterschaft System, FRENCH, GERMAN, SPANISH, or ITALIAN, was offered in 1891 on twenty-four cylinder records for each language: "A Revolution in the Study of Foreign Languages"

The Phonogram, October 1891

 

 

 

A version of the Columbia Phonograph Type "Q" was sold as the Languagephone with this logo on its lid (ca.1903). These machines were used to play Dr. Richard Rosenthal cylinder records and follow his Meistershaft System for learning French, Spanish, German or Italian.

 

 

 

 

The Berliner "Gramo-phone" in 1897 was promoted as a 'French Teacher, German Teacher, Spanish Teacher,' and 'Orator, Public Reader' (which could probably also have served as an 'elocutionary teacher').

The Cosmopolitan, 1897

 

 

 

 

The Saturday Evening Post, November 1901

 

 

 

 

 

"Learn French, Harper's 1903

 

 

 

July 1904, The Edison Phonograph Monthly

 

 

 

"Listen! to the voice of the greatest and most perfect language teacher in the world."

The Talking Machine World, February 15, 1907

 

 

 

 

Teaching parrots to talk using a Phonograph - Volume 5 The Technical World Magazine, 1906

 

 

 

"Noted educators are now pointing out the importance of the phonograph in "musically developing" children."

The Ladies' Home Journal, September 1921

 

 

In 1888 Edison wrote a new article for the North American Review titled "The Perfected Phonograph" and expanded his previous predications about its use for Education Purposes and Phonographic Books by saying that "in teaching the correct pronunciation of English, and especially of foreign languages, the phonograph as it stands seems to be beyond comparison, for no system of phonetic spelling can convey to the pupil the pronunciation of a good English, French, German or Spanish speaker so well as a machine that reproduced his utterances even more exactly than a human imiator could."

The War Department in 1943 issued various "Language Guides" for military personnel which included records that went along with the Guides. In the Danish Language Guide it was noted that "Danish, like English, is spoken differently in different regions. The pronunciation given on the phonograph records, which is that used in Copenhagen, will be understood wherever Danish is spoken, but it is always best to try to speak like the people among whomyou happen to be." The records that go with this Guide give you a number of the most important words and phrases in Danish....Remember tha you can't get the sound of a language from the printed word alone--you have to use your ears even more than your eyes." (Danish Introductory Series Language Guide, TM-30-311, p.5-6)

 

 

 

 

The Thomas Edison National Historic Park has a page titled Educational Lessons which has examples for language, music and dication education.

 

 

 

 

 

Phonographia